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1957 Johnson Outboard Motor Cowl Medallion New (repro - Nos) W/mounting Screws on 2040-parts.com

US $70.00
Location:

Framingham, Massachusetts, United States

Framingham, Massachusetts, United States
NOS plastic emblem. Made 15 years ago, but NEVER mounted on an engine. Has slightly less curve than an original, but easily tightened to flush with mounting screws. Bought unpainted and paint looks vintage (see picture). Also has a faded look (not shiney finish or paint) as it might look after 60 years.
Brand:Johnson

NOS "repro" emblem.  Includes mounting screws and nuts (stainless steel) plus a small aluminum washer. This plastic emblem fits all the 1957 Johnson outboard motors except the 3 HP model (which uses a decal instead). This is an exact duplicate to the original 1957 medallion with 2 mounting holes. Holes are 3 7/8" center-to-center. 1957 only - do NOT be confused with the 3 hole emblem used in 1958.  You cannot use this emblem (and think the 3rd hole will just be covered up) because those other 2 holes on the 1958 are just about 1/2 inch CLOSER together. It just won't fit unless you drill 3 new holes! Please see my notes above about the "curve" of this emblem. It doesn't sit flush on the cowl, but is easily tightened down. Not a problem for me, but if it is a problem for you do not buy. I will protect the emblem extremely well for mailing (which BTW is free). Shipping to the contiguous 48 states only. Please ask any questions.


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