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Autometer 4428 Ultra-lite Mechanical Nitrous Pressure Gauge * New * on 2040-parts.com

US $117.95
Location:

Pittston, Pennsylvania, United States

Pittston, Pennsylvania, United States
Condition:New Brand:AutoMeter Country/Region of Manufacture:United States Manufacturer Part Number:4428 UPC #:46074044281 Interchange Part Number:4428 Merchandising Name:Ultra-Lite Mechanical Warranty:No Important::CONFIRM FITMENT REFER TO COMPATIBILITY ABOVE UPC:046074044281

Mini John Cooper Works concept (2014) first official pictures

Tue, 17 Dec 2013 00:00:00 -0800

By Ollie Kew First Official Pictures 17 December 2013 16:00 This is the Mini John Cooper Works concept, which previews the look of the hottest version of the new third-gen Mini. The new JCW takes the larger, third-gen Mini three-door, which was revealed at Oxford last month, and gives it a triple nostrilled front bumper, red bodywork accents and myriad (doubtless superficial) vents for a racier look than its predecessor. New intakes also usurp the previous car’s front foglights, and 18in five-spoke alloys ape the look of the outgoing Mini GP flagship.

1928 Rolls-Royce Phantom 1 ‘Jarvis Torpedo’ at R.M. Auctions

Wed, 12 Aug 2009 00:00:00 -0700

Rolls Royce Phantom 1 ‘Jarvis Torpedo’ at Salon Prive, to be auctioned by R.M Auctions Well, we’ve now got a bit more information on the Phantom, and a few of the other goodies RM have in store, so we thought you might like the gen. The elegant, streamlined 1928 Rolls-Royce Phantom I ‘Jarvis Torpedo’, chassis number 17EX, boasts a rich history. One of only three experimental chassis produced by Rolls-Royce at the time, 17EX was completed and sold new to Maharaja Hari Sigh Bahadur, ruler of the princely state of Jammu and Kashmir, who kept the car until 1932.

Mercedes C 180 CGI BlueEFFICIENCY Review & Road Test (2010)

Sun, 15 Aug 2010 00:00:00 -0700

The Mercedes C180 CGI BlueEFFICIENCY in for a week for Review & Road Test There was a time when you knew what lurked beneath the bonnet of a Mercedes; the badge on the boot shouted it loud and clear. If it was an S500 you knew it had a 5.0 litre engine and if it said C180 you could safely assume you’d get a modest 1.8 litre lump to row Mercedes’ smallest saloon along. But things have got a bit more complicated over the years; probably because the cubic capacity of the engine is not necessarily an indication of its power.