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1960s supercars

Thu, 10 Jul 2008 00:00:00 -0700

By Tim Pollard and Ben Oliver

10 July 2008 16:00

Supercars in the Sixties

The swinging ’60s spawned many joyous things – and its spirit of liberalisation applied equally to the motor car. So we shouldn’t be surprised that it was the fun-filled decade that begat the supercar. The Lamborghini Miura was arguably first – and CAR’s own wizard of words, LJK Setright, penned the phrase that defined the breed: he called it the supercar.
Browse our GBU-style pick of the decade's landmarks below – and vote for your favourite supercar decade in our poll


 

Make and model

Year

Price

Engine

0-60mph

Top speed

1967

£8050

 3929cc V12, 350bhp, 286lb ft

6.3sec

163mph 

For 

 Gandini's styling... arguably the most beautiful car ever made  

Against 

 Ergonomics and reliability: this will become a theme

Verdict 

 Its engineering was as impressive as its looks: the Miura changed the motoring world

 

The Miura's steel monocoque chassis with its tranverse, mid-mounted V12 got the 1965 Turin motor show so excited that the reluctant Ferruccio was persuaded to put a body on it and build it. The supercar was born...

Related Articles: Other Lamborghini stories  


Make and model

Year

Price

Engine

0-60mph

Top speed

1965

£6700 

 4763cc V8, 306bhp, 329lb ft

 4.0sec

154mph

For 

 Do you really care that it was a racer first? 

Against 

 Dynamics and ergonomics betray those race-car roots

Verdict 

 Looks more at home in Gulf colours than a plain road paint job

 

The original GT40 was mid-engined, low, fast and rare. But it wasn't the first supercar; it was a race car developed with the sole intention of beating Ferrari at Le Mans, which it did four times. The road versions were an afterthought.

Related Articles: Other Ford stories


Make and model

Year

Price

Engine

0-60mph

Top speed

 1968

£9100

4390cc V12, 352bhp, 318lb ft

5.5sec

174mph

For 

 Sharky styling means it's still one of the great Ferraris  

Against 

 Miura made it look old the day it was launched

Verdict 

 Much-loved, despite its old-school layout

 

Never officially named the Daytona (but 365GTB/4 sounds so much less glamorous), this car stuck with the front-engined V12 layout despite the revolution wrought by the Miura two years earlier.

Related Articles:  Other Ferrari stories 

 


By Tim Pollard and Ben Oliver