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Government To Call Time On Tax Disc

Thu, 05 Dec 2013 00:00:00 -0800

THE HUMBLE tax disc is set to become a thing of the past, with Chancellor George Osborne planning to shake up the way we tax our vehicles as part of his Autumn Statement announcement.

After more than 90 years affixed to British motorists' cars, the tax disc is to be scrapped and replaced with a modern electronic system.

For the first time motorists will also be able to pay for their vehicle excise duty (VED) by monthly direct debit, although this will cost an extra 5%.

Also, the extra charge for paying for six months at a time will be reduced from 10% to 5% and the two measures are expected to save motorists who spread their payments over £20 million a year.

Crucially, scrapping the tax disc is expected to save businesses a total of £7 million a year in administration costs, but customers who are not online will still be able to tax their car in person at a Post Office or on the phone. The changes will be legislated for in next year's Finance Bill and will come into effect from October 2014.

Officials say the tax disc is no longer needed for enforcement purposes, with the Driver and Vehicle Licencing Agency and police already relying on an electronic register.

Vehicle tax was introduced in the 1888 budget and the system of excise duty applying specifically to motor vehicles was introduced in 1920, with the tax disc appearing the following year.


By Press Association reporters