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Young drivers risking lives by 'neglecting eyesight'

Thu, 14 Nov 2013 00:00:00 -0800

ONE IN SEVEN young drivers put themselves and other road users in danger because of poor vision and problems with their eyesight, according to a new study.

The survey, conducted on behalf of thinkaboutyoureyes.co.uk found that those in the 18-24 age bracket were far more likely than older drivers to have problems driving because of bad vision.

While more than half of drivers over 55 are required to wear glasses or corrective lenses when driving compared to just a third of young drivers, almost one in ten young drivers believe they actually probably should be wearing glasses when they drive.

The results also revealed that one in seven young drivers believe they have put themselves and their passengers

at risk because of their eyesight, compared to just one in 35 drivers over 55.

One in five young drivers say they have been unable to see road signs compared to one in 20 older drivers, while one in seven young drivers say they have trouble reading number plates on the car in front, compared to only one in 35 drivers over 55.

A third of those polled have driven onto a roundabout and narrowly missed being hit because they didn't spot the oncoming vehicle, while one in four drivers has experienced a near miss because a vehicle came out of nowhere.

More than 40% surveyed admit they are required to wear glasses while driving, yet one in ten road users admitted they don't always wear them when behind the wheel.

These shocking figures emerged following a poll amongst drivers between the ages of 18 and 60 to mark the launch of a new winter driving campaign ahead of Road Safety Week next week which begins on the 18th of November.

The Think About Your Eyes campaign hopes to identify poor eyesight on the road and urge drivers to take extra care as the nights draw in and visibility worsens.

The campaign has specialist independent opticians around Britain running roadside checks, free on-the-spot consultations and advice about where to go for a full eye examination.


By Press Association reporters