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Can-am Commander 800 1000 Oem Yellow Hood (705008187) on 2040-parts.com

US $400.00
Location:

Cedar Grove, Wisconsin, United States

Cedar Grove, Wisconsin, United States
NEW NO TAGS, NEVER INSTALLED. NOT IN ORIGINAL BOX.
Manufacturer Part Number:705008187 Compatible Make:COMMANDER Brand:CAN-AM Compatible Model:800 1000 UPC:Does not apply

UP FOR SALE IS A BRAND NEW OEM FRONT HOOD IN YELLOW FOR VARIOUS CAN AM COMMANDER MODELS INCLUDING THE 800 AND 1000 ENGINES.  WILL FIT BASE, XT, XTP, AND XMR.  DOUBLE CHECK PART NUMBER 705008187 FOR ACCURATE FITMENT.

GRAB IT CHEAP!

$400 WITH FREE SHIPPING!

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