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Vw Beetle Radio Non Monsoon Cd Mp3 Satellite Ready on 2040-parts.com

US $180.00
Location:

Schaumburg, Illinois, US

Schaumburg, Illinois, US
Item must be returned within:14 Days Refund will be given as:Money Back Return shipping will be paid by:Buyer Restocking Fee:No Returns Accepted:Returns Accepted Return policy details:

VW Beetle Radio Non Monsoon CD Changer with Satellite Ready

This radio plays MP3 CDs. It has no scratches, dents, and looks brand new, and comes with a 3 month warranty. The radio is completely remanufactured and aligned to factory specifications. It comes with the Security Code. If you are not satisfied you can send it back within 14 Days for your money back. We completely re-manufacture the whole radio for function, reception, and CD Changer Input. We inspect the inside of the radio for any moisture damage and corrosion. Due to the design of the vehicle, condensation can cause water to leak into the air vent build on top of the radio causing damage. If any damage we scrap the radio. We also inspect the CD Mechanism and replace and update the gear pack, because 90% of these types of radios are famous with ejecting problems.

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