Find or Sell any Parts for Your Vehicle in USA

Olds F85 Starfire 88 98 Right Front " Nos " Fender Extension Part # 583384 Gm on 2040-parts.com

US $90.00
Location:

East Flat Rock, North Carolina, United States

East Flat Rock, North Carolina, United States
Condition:New

THIS IS A BRAND NEW OLD STOCK OLDSMOBILE F85 FULL SIZE STARFIRE 88 98 RIGHT FRONT FENDER  EXTENSION  IT HAS BEEN STORED IN A OLD BODY SHOP FOR 40+ YEARS THAT CLOSED .I ASK YOU TO LOOK CLOSE TO THE PICTURES TO MAKE SURE THIS IS WHAT YOU'RE LOOKING FOR ,I'M SELLING (AS IS ) NO RETURNS  [NO SHIPPING OUTSIDE THE US ]

Hyundai to tone down ‘Fluidic Design’ for ‘Fluidic Precision’

Mon, 23 Jul 2012

Hyundai’s US boss, John Krafcik, has said that Hyundai will refine their ‘Fluidic Design’ in to something they’re calling ‘Fludic Precision’. The Hyundai Fluidic Design language was really the start of Hyundai’s move from Halford’s special to mainstream car maker. But the design language is starting to look a bit fussy and Hyundai are reacting to that by moving towards what they call ‘Fluidic Precision’ (there’s already a less fussy look about the new Santa Fe).

Lee Noble announces his new supercar project

Thu, 19 Nov 2009

The spirit of the original Noble M12 will be revived by the new Fenix Automotive supercar from Lee Noble By Tim Pollard Motor Industry 19 November 2009 01:00 Brit supercar visionary Lee Noble today has announced his new supercar project. His latest venture is called Fenix Automotive Limited – and it'll launch a new sub-£75,000 V8 supercar by this time next year, it was revealed today.The new Fenix-designed sports car will be a lightweight, mid-engined V8 that'll carry on where the original Noble M12 and M400 left off. Although the new supercar hasn't been named yet, Noble promises it'll be an ideal track-day tool capable of ripping to 100mph in less than seven seconds or pootling around on a weekend road trip.Hang on.

Design Services: Car Menu launched

Wed, 18 May 2005

Within almost every automotive design department throughout the world, their comes a time when a junior designer is dispatched to find a picture of some new model's tail lamp, the side view of a particular class leading competitor or examples of several new cars' colour and trim packages. Whilst looking at the competition is not necessarily a healthy way of finding ideas, it is often essential to demonstrate what is feasible, check in-house proposals are not too derivative, or show how advanced a design theme is relative to the same type of cars on the market. But even if the particular aspect of a car can be found, press packs and magazines typically show cars in the flattering light of an exotic location or being drifted around a corner on opposite lock; rarely are these images particularly useful.